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Books by Alumni:
> > Religion and Philosophy

image: Class Notes headlineJ. Harley Chapman, AM'69, AM'70, PhD'84, and Nancy K. Frankenberry, editors, Interpreting Neville (SUNY Press). This collection of essays assesses philosopher and theologian Robert Neville's work in metaphysics, theology, comparative studies, and cultural criticism. Continuing the dialogue, Neville provides responses to each essay.

Paul Franco, PhD'87, Hegel's Philosophy of Freedom (Yale University Press). Franco traces the development of Hegel's ideas of freedom, both situating them within the thinker's philosophical system and relating them to the larger tradition of modern political philosophy.

Bernard Linsky, AB'71, Russell's Metaphysical Logic (CSLI Publications). Linsky examines the philosophical foundations of Alfred North Whitehead and Bertrand Arthur Russell's book Principia Mathematica.

Barbara Pitkin, AM'87, PhD'94, What Pure Eyes Could See: Calvin's Doctrine of Faith in Its Exegetical Context (Oxford University Press). Through a detailed analysis of selected biblical passages, Pitkin traces the evolution of John Calvin's thought and establishes the exegetical underpinnings to his view of faith.

Andrew Tempelman, AM'66, PhD'72, The Patchwork Gospels: Gospel Origins in the First, Second, and Third Centuries (Aretree Press). Tempelman looks at the origins of the New Testament, arguing that the gospels were primarily written by six writers in the second century, who originated the works rather than citing or quoting established beliefs.

James O. Yerkes, AM'69, PhD'76, editor, John Updike and Religion: The Sense of the Sacred and the Motions of Grace (William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company). These 15 essays, with an introduction by Updike, consider the religious dimension of his literary vision. The essays explore what Updike terms the "sense of the sacred," as it influences human experience and as a foundation of American religious understanding.

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  APRIL 2000

  > > Volume 92, Number 4


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